How do I know I’m getting a good deal from my lender?

With so many products offered by various lenders, it can be quite perplexing trying to figure out whether or not you’ve scored yourself a good deal on your home loan.

While doing your research and comparing what’s out there in the market is one of the most obvious ways to find out whether you’re sitting on a good deal, it can be a time consuming practice and an overwhelming experience for those without specialist knowledge of the mortgage sector.

“It’s good to shop around, and yes you can use comparison websites, but because lenders call like products different names, it can get very difficult comparing apples with apples,” advises the finance broker. “Brokers know the special names and pricing, so it’s worthwhile working with one as not only will it save you time but you’ll also get a well-rounded understanding of the advantages of each product.”

That understanding of each product’s pros and cons is essential, because the best deal isn’t necessarily just the one with the lowest interest rate. It ultimately comes down to finding a loan that suits your plans – whether those plans are to pay the loan off as quickly as possible, to use it to fund renovations or investment down the track, or to pay the lowest total interest and fees over the life of a loan – and to finding a lender that will provide that loan at the level of finance required.

“Imagine you’re wanting to buy your dream home. Now, different lenders will lend varying amounts based upon the same criteria,” says the finance broker. “So that could mean that the lender with the sharpest rate may lend $200,000 less than the one with a slightly higher rate. If you really want that property, you’re going to have to go with the one with the higher rate, which may only make a few thousand dollars difference a year in interest repayments.”

We have specialist knowledge of products from multiple lenders, to ensure you are getting a good deal. Get in touch today if you are looking for advice.

What are the extra costs of buying a home?

Application & establishment fees, stamp duty + more.

When taking out a mortgage, many people forget to consider the associated fees and expenses. Here are some of the extra costs that you’ll need to consider when you take out a home loan.

Home loan application fees

Most lenders charge a home loan application fee. This can range from loan to loan, and covers:

  • Loan contracts
  • Property title checks
  • Credit checks
  • Attending a settlement

Mortgage fees and costs

Mortgage establishment fees – Lenders generally charge a mortgage establishment fee – a fee for setting up a mortgage.

  • Property valuation – A third party chosen by the lender, is appointed to determine the value of your land and improvements.
  • Mortgage registration – Your Mortgage deed needs to be registered with the government.
  • Mortgage stamp duty – Some State Governments charges stamp duty to register your mortgage.
  • Lenders mortgage insurance – If you don’t have 20% of the purchase price or the value of the property, the lender will require you to pay  for a lenders mortgage insurance policy that covers their risk in the event you default on your repayments.

Property fees and costs

  • Building, Pest and Electrical Inspection fees – It’s wise to have your property inspected for any structural or electrical problems and for pests (e.g. termites).
  • Stamp duty – Governments charge Stamp Duty to transfer the ownership of a property.
  • Registration of transfer fee – The new owner of the property needs to be registered at the Land Titles Office.
  • Legal fees – You generally need to pay a Solicitor of Settlement Agent to handle the transfer of ownership of the property on your behalf
  • Home & contents insurance – Most homeowners insure their home and contents against a range of threats: burglary, fire, storm, etc. Lenders insist that your property is insured while you have a mortgage.
  • Life and income protection insurance – Borrowers should consider protecting their incomes and themselves while they have a mortgage.
  • Utility costs – Connecting electricity, gas and telephone can attract a fee.
  • Council Rates – Your local council charges rates to cover garbage collection and a host of other services.
  • Water Rates – The water corporation charges rates for the supply and upkeep of water to your property.
  • Body corporate fees – If you buy an apartment or Strata Titled property, body corporate fees are charged, and some fees can be significant – particularly if the building is in need of a major work (e.g. concrete cancer, security upgrade, new hot water system, etc) or if there are lifts, pools and other communal facilities.
  • Maintenance costs – Don’t forget to make provision for regular maintenance on your home – even if you decide not to undertake significant renovation.

To learn more about the hidden costs of buying a home, and discuss how we can help you, get in touch today.